I know that a lot of people consider registration week to be the most stressful week of the semester. You might worry and wonder:

Do I have everything I need?

Should I really be taking this class?

Do I have to talk to my adviser?

Fear not, because I’m going to address every registration anxiety you may have, whether you’re a first-year student or a seasoned senior.  

1. What do I need for registration?

First of all, you need an access code. To get your access code, you need to meet with your adviser, which isn’t as hard or scary as it sounds.

Most advisers will send out some sort of email reminding you to set up an appointment with them. Although, some advisers might encourage your newfound adult independence by letting you contact them first.

Either way, your adviser is there to help you! Think of them as just another person in your field who shares the same passions as you, but with slightly more knowledge.

If you have any further questions about advising or need further support, be sure to check out Advising Services.  

Secondly, figure out when your registration window is. This tells you the exact day and time when you can register for your classes. Make sure to check if you have any registration holds, as well. You won’t be able to register if you have any, so get those taken care of sooner than later. You can locate both of these on your eServices account under “Courses & Registration”.

2. How do I know which classes to take?

The easiest way to figure out which classes to take is to look at your Degree Audit Report, or DARS. Your DARS shows you every class you’ve ever taken, as well as all the classes you’ll need to take to fulfill your general and degree requirements.

Translation: it’s your roadmap to academic success.

To access your DARS, go onto your eServices account and log in with your StarID and password. From there, go to “Academic Records” and click on “Degree Audit.”

Also, most departments and majors give you a “major map” to help you plan out your classes at WSU. You can use a major map to not only decide when to take which classes, but also keep track of what you haven’t taken yet.

If the paper version is too old-fashioned for you, most of these major maps can be found on the online course catalog. Just locate your program, and you’ll be on your way.

The other way to know which classes you need is to simply talk to your adviser! They have direct access to information that you may not, such as which classes are offered when and if you should take certain classes now or later.  

Whatever classes you decide to enroll in, add them to your wishlist on your eServices account under “Courses & Registration”. That way, you’re ready to go on your registration day and won’t feel rushed at the last minute.

3. What if I can’t get into the classes I need?

Unfortunately, you won’t always be able to get into the classes you need or want, especially if you are a first-year or sophomore student. But, it’s okay!

WSU offers many different classes to fulfill each General Education goal, and many more semesters to get into the classes you need.

If you really can’t get into a class you absolutely must have this semester, then go talk to your–I think you know where I’m going with this–adviser! They can help you blue card into a class, or even help you figure out a different class to take.  

While registration week can be stressful, I choose to look at it as a week of new opportunity.

Each semester brings you closer to your future and every class and professor will give you valuable life skills.

Even the dreaded 8 a.m. class has taught me to be a morning person–well, almost. Let’s face it, that’s an adult skill that few of us have mastered!

When in doubt, Records and Registration Services is here to help you. Happy registration, Warriors!

 

Updated by Hailey Seipel ’20 on 06/15/2020

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Emma Cavanaugh

Emma is majoring in English Writing, and minoring in Theatre, as well as English Literature and Language. Though she hails from Lake City, MN, the birthplace of waterskiing, Emma has actually never been waterskiing. She's always excited to try new things though and is interested in health and wellness topics.

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