Mixing & Matching of Vaccines

An individual who receives a second or third dose different than their initial vaccine, will be “mixing and matching” their vaccine series. CDC now allows for eligible individuals to choose which vaccine they would like to receive as a booster 

This will help those who are eager and eligible to get their booster shot faster by allowing them to mix and match. It will save the hassle of needing to call around to various vaccine clinics to see what doses they have on hand. Which, in turn, will also help to further boost nationwide vaccine rates and herd immunity as we head into the winter season. 

Is it safe to mix & match?

So far, experts say that there is no evidence that mixing and matching vaccines will cause any harm. A recent study with 458 individuals showed no adverse or severe side effects with mixing and matching the vaccines. In general, we know that all 3 types of vaccines in the US have been proven effective in preventing serve illness, death, and even protecting us against variants. 

Why would I want to mix and match my COVID Vaccine?

Even when vaccines were first made available to everyone 18 and older, people had a preference over which one they had as their primary vaccine. Some preferred the two-doses of Pfizer or Moderna where others wanted to be one and done with Johnson & Johnson. This same principle applies with getting a booster dose. 

Is one combination of mixing and matching better than the other?

There is limited data on if a certain combination of COVID-19 vaccines is more effective in preventing illness versus the other. However, one thing is certain – getting a booster shot of any COVID-19 vaccine will increase the number antibodies and strengthen your immunity in fighting off the virus if you get exposed to it. 

COVID-19 vaccines are offered daily via walk-in at Health & Wellness Services upstairs in the clinic IWC 222 M–F 10–11:30AM & 2:30–4PM. Please bring your student ID and insurance information with you. Don’t forget to self-report your vaccine! 

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Amy Nelson

Amy Nelson graduated in 2020 with a degree in Art: I-Design. As a student, she worked with the University Marketing & Communications team as a writer and photographer. She was hired after graduation to support public health communications during the COVID-19 pandemic.